LET’S HEAR IT FOR 1984 AT THE BRATTLE

“The series is an indulgence, admits the Brattle’s creative director Ned Hinkle. ‘I’m not too shy to say it is my 50th birthday this year and this is my gift to myself. When I think about movies that were formative for me or are special to me, it seems like a lot of them come from 1984, a year that gave us Buckaroo Banzai, Repo Man and Streets Of Fire,’ he smiles.” – WBUR’s The ARTery, 12/08/2021

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TOMBSTONE BLUES: THE SOUR REVISIONISM OF FRANK PERRY’S DOC

Doc dismantles the Western limb-from-limb, trying to see how much nothing it can leave you with. I admire the effrontery of its anti-entertaining intentions while I can’t imagine a film I’d want to watch again less. It’s a sad, muted little movie in which people plod off to their inevitable ends, the gunfight at the O.K. Corral more like a massacre than any test of mettle. ” – Crooked Marquee, 11/19/2021

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POSSESSION AND ARREBATO AT THE BRATTLE

“Żuławski’s Possession is a singular cinematic experience and probably the greatest breakup movie ever made, in which all the roiling emotions are externalized and untethered from any recognizable reality. It’s the most unhinged thing I’ve ever seen, and that’s before she starts sneaking off to have graphic sex with a giant, slimy tentacle monster.” – WBUR’s The ARTery, 11/11/2021

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ROBERT MITCHUM MONTH: HIS KIND OF WOMAN

“Mitchum mastered a look of mild amusement at the machinations of the Western and noir plots that followed his characters around. He sometimes seemed like he’d already seen this movie before and was killing time until cocktail hour, unflappable in his commitment to effortlessness. The Rat Pack guys swaggered. Robert Mitchum sauntered.” – Crooked Marquee, 11/05/2021

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NOIRVEMBER AT THE COOLIDGE AND THE BRATTLE

“Earlier this summer, critic Gerry Peary was conducting a Facebook poll of the best American film noirs, asking colleagues for ranked ballots of their favorites. As I am apparently the only movie reviewer in the world who hates making lists, I was completely flummoxed by Professor Peary’s assignment and told him to just put Touch Of Evil down ten times.” – WBUR’s The ARTery, 11/01/2021

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DIVIDED STATES OF AMERICA: RECONSTRUCTION IN THE OUTLAW JOSEY WALES

The Outlaw Josey Wales is the first of Eastwood’s directorial efforts to try and reconcile these two seemingly contradictory sides of its director’s personality: the snarling, reactionary avenger and the groovy, NorCal dude who digs foreign films and jazz. It’s a tension that animates all his most interesting work, and to this day remains unresolved.” – Crooked Marquee, 10/22/2021

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OZYMANDIAS IN NEW JERSEY: REVISITING THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS

“A monument to ruin, it’s one of those great, misshapen movies full of bizarre tonal shifts and strange directorial choices that don’t seem to make much sense in the moment but linger in your mind for months afterward. Pauline Kael called it ‘an unqualified disaster of the type that only talented people have.’ I think it might be something of a masterpiece.” – Crooked Marquee, 10/08/2021

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AFRICAN-AMERICAN NEO-NOIR AT THE BRATTLE

“These four terrific pictures brought issues of race to the forefront of twisty, throwback crime stories. Classic noirs from the ‘40s and ‘50s reflected and amplified the anxieties of traumatized men returning to a changed America after WWII, whereas these ‘90s counterparts applied that sort of doomy, old-fashioned fatalism to structural social injustice.” – WBUR’s The ARTery, 09/22/2021

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WE STILL LIKE TO WATCH: BLUE VELVET AT 35

“The film’s centerpiece sequence is one of the most boldly transgressive in modern cinema, a terrifying tightrope walk of abuse and illicit longings that famously sent viewers fleeing from their seats. Blue Velvet speaks to something primal about moviegoing itself: we’re all in that closet with Jeffrey. If we didn’t like to watch we wouldn’t be at the movies in the first place.” – Crooked Marquee, 09/17/2021

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MARTY AFTER MIDNITE AT THE COOLIDGE

“It might be Scorsese’s most manic movie, disjunctively doubling back through dissolves so we’re seeing things from multiple angles at once. The camera flips on its side or upside down altogether, with Van Morrison’s wheezy, queasy ‘TB Sheets’ percolating over and over on the soundtrack, his wailing harmonica standing in for the ambulance’s siren.” – WBUR’s The ARTery, 09/10/2021

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